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Reading Can Benefit Animals As Much As Humans

Many people enjoy reading, and now it seems like even animals are beginning to participate in this productive hobby. That’s right, even animals are readers now! Well, animals are at least listening to other people reading, and it’s actually helping them out. According to KPVI, a new program at the Pocatello Animal Shelter encourages children […]

Reading Can Benefit Animals As Much As Humans

Many people enjoy reading, and now it seems like even animals are beginning to participate in this productive hobby.

That’s right, even animals are readers now! Well, animals are at least listening to other people reading, and it’s actually helping them out.

According to KPVI, a new program at the Pocatello Animal Shelter encourages children to read books to the animals. The program helps the kids with their reading abilities and helps the animals become more comfortable interacting with humans.

“The first time that I’d actually seen children reading to the animals and how the animals responded, where they crawled real close to the edge of their kennels and laid down and listened, I started crying just because it touched my so much that children and animals have such a close connection and how they seem to understand each other,” said Kim Velman, Volunteer Coordinator at the Pocatello Animal Shelter.

Whether you’re reading to animals, reading at the beach (which 48% of beachgoers prefer to do), cramming for a test (which 100% of college students do), or simply reading in your bed before you go to sleep, there are plenty of good reasons to pick up a book.

The Huffington Post reports that reading can actually help you sleep better, makes you more empathetic, and even improves the overall strength of your brain.

“We shouldn’t underestimate the effects of everyday activities, such as reading and writing, on our children, ourselves, and our parents or grandparents,” said Robert S. Wilson of Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

Wilson authored a study that recorded the mental activity of patients, including 294 seniors who passed away at an average age of 89.

He concluded, “Our study suggests that exercising your brain by taking part in activities such as these across a person’s lifetime, from childhood through old age, is important for brain health in old age.”

Even reading a few pages a night can improve your memory and boost your well-being. So grab a book, sit down with your dog, and enjoy!

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