1938 News - Your #1 News Source

SEARCH
Uncategorized
0

Severe Weather and Extreme Heat Plaguing U.S. Cities

An average ROI of 78.6% might be why some American citizens are thinking about replacing their windows, but this summer’s weather has countless more thinking about reinforced glass for different reasons. Multiple weather-related issues have cropped up across the U.S. this week, and according to the National Weather Service, they’re going to keep coming. Temperatures […]

Severe Weather and Extreme Heat Plaguing U.S. Cities

An average ROI of 78.6% might be why some American citizens are thinking about replacing their windows, but this summer’s weather has countless more thinking about reinforced glass for different reasons.

Multiple weather-related issues have cropped up across the U.S. this week, and according to the National Weather Service, they’re going to keep coming.

Temperatures reaching 100 degrees as well as dangerously high humidity levels are set to combine and deliver a potentially fatal heat wave to a vast majority of the central and southern U.S. this week.

“This may be one of the worst heat waves in the last few decades,” the National Weather Service warned.

Multiple heat advisories and warnings have been posted in upwards of 16 states in the Central and Southern part of the United States.

While heat may be a concern for residents of the South, the Northeast region has been torn apart by thunderstorms this week.

More than 4,000 customers of Central Maine Power were without electricity Tuesday morning as a result of severe thunderstorms on Monday.

Damaged trees and electrical wires were reported across the central region of the state as the area was devastated by fierce winds and golf ball-size hail amid tornado and thunderstorm warnings.

On average, the state sees about two tornadoes annually, though none have been reported, according to meteorologist Tom Hawley of the National Weather Service.

More than 70 reports of trees and wires down came into the Somerset County Emergency Management Agency in the span of two hours on Monday afternoon, Emergency Management Agency Director Mike Smith said.

“It’s been busy — literally nuts,” Smith said, “but so far there hasn’t been anything major.”

Fortunately, none of the reports involved serious damage or injuries, but a woman in New Jersey wasn’t so lucky.

A 26-year-old woman was killed when she was electrocuted by wires that fell on her car during a severe storm in New Jersey.

A tree was knocked over during the storm, putting tension on the wires and causing them to fall on top of the woman’s car. When she attempted to leave the vehicle, a wire struck her elbow, delivering a fatal amount of electricity.

Regardless of the type of weather plaguing the area, officials are urging citizens to take caution in these extreme conditions.

Share:
  • googleplus
  • linkedin
  • tumblr
  • rss
  • pinterest
  • mail
1938@1938news.com'

Author: 1938 News

There are 0 comments

Leave a comment

Want to express your opinion?
Leave a reply!