Windows 10 :: Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC – What are we announcing today?

Looking for:

Windows 10 enterprise ltsc 2019 vs 2016 free download

Click here to Download

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

How do you manage updates? Windows 10 will certainly outlive the HW, but while it does so, it is extending the life of that HW. Tell me more? Have you check free diskspace? This is one of the most common sources of update failures, lacking free space to download and install the updates.

Do you have 3rd party encryption and security products that might be conflicting? Many then, fewer today still, required you to first uninstall, update the 3rd party tools before the update, though I would expect you would have worked through this with other devices that did update, so check disk space. Have you used the Setup Diag tool?

Tell me more about the “drastic change” breaking your application. If this is the case, by all means, take advantage of our App Assure program, no cost to you, and we will correct or help re-mediate the issue for you. I’m not sure if i can disclose such information even the name in-house app. What i meant, that one might assume that going from March version to September one can expect it to be mostly compatible.

This seems like might be such example. Although looking at Insider builds there are still a bunch of changes, not just small fixes. I’ll be very clear.

If you have an app that is using undocumented calls, or other non-supported approaches, no-promises. It’s often the little things that are annoying. I don’t have a large deployment but every release there is something that takes time to fix and track down. I had to repair the pdf printer for a LOB app. It’s typically something relating to printing, one time it was an Outlook app that stopped working and I had to repair it. At home I’ve lost my hdmi display to my Lenovo docking station and this isn’t a cheap laptop either.

To be honest, I really do not see how you have such a big issue keeping up to date on Windows First off, LTSC is a bad choice for close to every user in any case, to many potential pitfalls and limitations. Managing computers without management tools is not easy, but if your are serious you should also be serious managing your computers, making sure they are up to date and compliant.

With an increasing degree of travel and out of office usage, as well as interaction with external systems and users, firewalls are not the most important point of security any more, the endpoint is.

Not having absolute control of the endpoint can turn out more expensive than you might think. I’m using a combination of SCCM and Intune managing endpoints, and as a single admin I manage thousands of devices, Windows, iOS and Android, in a more diverse, both geographically and methodically, environment than most other businesses.

As for the issues, well, I did not experience any. Nor did I have any issues with any other release either. My impression is, most people did not have any issues, but a small percentage of close to a billion devices is still many systems and users. When the new release is out, I wait a few weeks before I update a small set of test computers in my office. I do some testing trying to provoke some errors, while also looking for people having issues online, trying to identify HW and SW setups common for our environment.

I then deploy for the entire organisation. All data is stored off device, and a full device rollback takes about one hour, should something go bad. So far I’ve had issues with one upgrade on one computer, out of several thousands. And, after redeploying the OS, every update since were ok. In a perfect world we would have more people testing every computer type with every software before deploying the upgrades, but needless to say, this is not possible with just one person managing clients.

At some point, something might go wrong, we all know this. But we have disaster recovery plans, and most users can do a OSD from their own desk getting the system operational within the hour. We find that keeping the endpoints secure and compliant is more important in the long run.

Andres Pae Nobody said do not use LTSC, and your example of static, automated systems, conducting the same tasks over and over, with little use of new features, doing nothing but these specific tasks, well this could be one of the use cases where LTSC is the best choice. Just think it through first. Serpentbane, but that is the point. Microsoft made it very hard on Windows 10 to get rid of things the Organization does not want – things like setting file associations etc.

Also, we deploy our devices for a four year cycle, and by using LTSC, we could just deploy these devices and keep them on one version for the entire Lifecycle – no changes, no stuff breaking. It is the little things that happen with the Windows 10 updates – defaults get changed, they add new icons to the task bar I had a ton of support calls when the unwanted “Mail” App was auto-pinned to the taskbar with upgrades , the interface is changing constantly looking at you, Windows Search Neither do we want that as Admins.

Also, people HATE when the upgrades arrive. And I have trouble forcing my users to have a single reboot a month as it is IT had to override Management on that one. Just remember that back on any other version of Windows, you only had to worry about deploying to a device once, have it auto-configured by whatever scripts you built, and only worry about the monthly updates. Now, with every new Windows 10 version I have to verify that my scripts still work PSA: often they get broken by changes from Microsoft , I have to verify my Drivers and Software all still work, figure out where Microsoft changed the presets set by users in the upgrade process, where they added unwanted “features” and GUI elements, update my GPOs Administering Windows 10 devices to a level that my Organization wants not to a level that Microsoft deems “suitable” creates about five times as much work as Windows 7 or Windows XP did before.

I know, a lot of people seem to like Edge, Cortana, etc.. We don’t want them, we don’t need them. We just want Devices for our Lifecycle that behave consistently from one day to another, and GUI changes are not consistency. It was hard enough to figure out how to turn most of the annoyances on Windows 10 off, but to have to do it repeatedly every months is just..

Just as an anecdote, I had a script why do I need a script for this that unpinned Edge from the Task bar – as it was not a normal icon but some system functionality deeply hidden that put it there. In the end, it worked and the icon was gone – and it worked fine in or older. When we moved to , it still worked that it unpinned the icon – but now users couldn’t pin stuff to the taskbar anymore, as it was forgetting the pins after logout. Why is simple stuff like that so hard I am currently moving all our devices up to , and when that is done, to Create one Year of overlap from one release to the next.

Whenever I hear someone telling me they ” do not see how you have such a big issue” with anything, I totally get it. They don’t see it because they don’t have to work in the environment we work. So they don’t understand it, and naturally they don’t see what the issue is. When that happens, maybe, just maybe, I’ll believe Microsoft has a clue on what is required for the enterprise. Yeah I can agree with that however the SAC version is based on the full edition.

It would be cool if they did create a combo of the two where you did have the benefits of SAC but with the commercial apps like Xbox and weather removed. But not enough demand or a market space for that type of product. I’m recommending an evaluation of LTSC for programs I’m the security manager over and I have a question that I hope the community would address.

How is the backwards compatibility of LTSC? For example, if I’m using hardware from or earlier will support the hardware? If you are using hardware from you are in bigger trouble anyway! Regardless what the bad guys say, here is the only one truth: Windows 10 any edition only works on SSD drives!

Well, because it was designed that way. For example to supply water you have to use copper or plastic pipes. They designed for that. You cannot use paper pipes – they will melt in seconds. Same here: if you still use HDD – your Windows 10 won’t work well. It will work, but much worse than XP or Win 7.

Besides, please try to understand one thing: ALL editions of Windows 10 are the same. Missing features. And different versions. But they are the same. And all applications works regardless. Those are time wasters and tire kickers! Those are truly bad guys! Because this way they can justify their salaries by doing nothing! Including LTSE. So now you are not limited to lousy and slow IE You can enjoy new EDGE which is absolutely best browser in the world today!

And the rest? Who use Cortana? Who needs Store? This is a first thing that any Enterprise would ban and prohibit – MS Store. Because this is a big Pandora box. I hope you know why you said you are security guy? Hope this can help Interesting how we have many computers on campus all running Windows 10 various editions on regular hard drives, not SSD drives.

We have a mixed pool of laptops from 8yr to brand new. We don’t have any problems running windows 10 on the older kit. Where I have needed drivers and there aren’t any for Windows 10, I have installed them for older operating systems and these work well. As the older kit breaks, we scavenge any relevant components to fix the remaining laptops.

A portion of our user base are very harsh on the laptops, so the older rugged machines handle this the best. When we have spare funds, we do put in a SSD but we haven’t found it necessary. By default the LTSC edition doesn’t have the xbox apps natively installed, however you can install them.

There is a “MultiLang App Update” release, which you can download from your microsoft account. My users like Sticky Notes, Photos and couple of the other apps. I installed them from the App Update pack without any problems. First to your question, as a general rule, yes, current version of Windows 10 work on older hardware.

If you purchased a new machine in , the current version of Windows 10, if your using MS update service, has been updated to your machine, moving it forward. That is the general principal, but as in all of life, there are footnotes in small print at the bottom of the page. You mention devices as old as or older. There are driver support requirements that may be potential issues for you.

That would be for Win10 regardless of LTSC or SAC, no difference there, We certainly updated 10’s of millions of devices in and that were at the time years old, so it was a common scenario, but again in general, its was the very old devices that had the higher rates if issues, not surprising. So its likely to install and run, but cant say for sure. The OEM I’m pretty sure is no longer supporting it.

Depending on how the device is being used, you will see perf impact. You did not give details on the use case , but sense you did call out your security manager, I do want to call out and be clear for you and other readers, The most secure option with Windows 10 will be SAC, and not LTSC.

Both get security patches each month, but SAC editions get new security features and functionality, many targeting and or addressing the latest attack strategies. LTSC is often, incorrectly thought to be the choice for secure, locked down devices, and that really is a SAC build, where we continue to innovate and advance the security capabilities of Windows, every 6 months. New versions do get new security features, but also new flaws.

What gives.. New versions not only get new security features, but also new features in general. Rather large updates could also present new vulnerabilities, this is to be expected. Ever since initially looking into rolling out W10 years ago I have ached so much to be able to just use the LTSC release and get on with it.

You say that the LTSC is intended for environments where use cases and requirements don’t change over time. My response to this is that empiraclly speaking, we simply don’t use any “features” of the OS itself to drive our organisation forward. Our business needs are met by software vendors developing applications that we simply install on our base image or run via web-apps, not by the OS itself.

Our security needs are catered for in our infrastructure itself and again by third party solutions. I’d also wager that this is what a majority of businesses need, nothing more than a simple platform on which they can build to their own requirements, not Microsoft’s. I welcome additional features in the name of security but there appears to be no allowing here for IT admins to make their choices and not have to feel like they’re being punished for it.

I’ve fought too much against changing behaviours in Windows 10 releases where I need to find new services to disable for performance reasons or where something I did in a Group Policy for one release is undone by another. I’ve got file associations being reset anytime a user moves to a new VM that are an absolute pain to manage. UWP replacements for stock Windows apps are no longer simple to manage because they’re “provisioned” on a per-user basis rather than just being “installed”.

I can’t get “Photos” for crying out loud to open an image for any user without staring at a blank window for seconds.

The classic image viewer? I could go on and on and on. It constantly feels like a battle with Windows 10 and I’m exhausted with it! What we’d love is to be able to use LTSC as our base image, install exactly what we need and just get on. SAC goes completely against this.

You say you “don’t use any OS features”?. Pretty sure this is not actually true, let me explain, and I’ll put aside for now the end user innovations and improvements that have been added, that you your users may be missing out on. When you do replace, add HW, do you try to acquire the best performance for price at the time its acquired? If so, your taking advantage to the Windows 10 Silicon policy, where new HW is first enabled on the current version of Windows 10, and would not be supported for example on the LTSC release.

Those are features that have been and are improved with each Windows 10 update. That is the stack that is currently the focus of development and testing by your vendors of choice, silicon, oem and os.

Do you stay current with firmware updates and drivers? From things like Windows Info protection to Application Guard, you have much richer tools and better capabilities to address your security needs, again while focusing on user productivity.

But all that side. You can choose to use LTSC. While I explained above what it was designed for, customer still choose with version they choose to purchase and use. Certainly we did that a lot in the first releases, but that was a big focus through to respect and persist. If and when it happens today, we want to know it and fix it. Thanks again , and let me know how I can help, with what ever version of Windows 10 you choose to run.

I’m the only one managing clients in my organization, and we have thousands of clients with different needs and users. First off, we have not experienced a single issue with updates for as long as I can remember. And, who are we to say what our users need? I have never told anyone about the my phone feature, yet I discovered many of our users were all over it.

And, W10 is getting better, why stick with the old? From a management point of view, many mgmt features require the latest versions. You don’t need to prevent W10 from evolving, you need to evolve yourself. No, GPO’s are not the future, and if you miss them you are only scared of changes and improvements. Why am I writing this? Simply because it’s clear the desktop OS is becoming less and less relevant – most of our users are just working in the cloud on whatever they have at home.

We have a few legacy apps finance, why is it always finance!? So perhaps instead of adding more and more features to Windows 10 and poo-pooing people who are using LTSC, MS should be thinking about a lightweight, easy to service, image of Windows aimed at users who spend most of their time in the web browser not the desktop OS.

By the way – big kudos to the Edge team – from hating the original version I’m really liking the new Chromium-based Edge, ‘Profiles’ are invaluable. So, you say the OS is irrelevant, all is web, Chrome book is great, and then go on to say the experience is best on desktop, Windows then Mac. Truth is, the OS does matter. The OS is the thing tieing the experiences together.

Chrome OS was supposed to be a web OS, because all you need is web. But it’s not. Because, web alone is not enough.

And if you do feel it is, the feel free to use web only. But if you need the OS, then use the propper and intended OS. The LTSC was made with a particular user case in mind, and that is not user computers. How long would Windows be a thing if Windows did not evolve? Sure, for some LTSC is a must have, for most its not. If your users don’t need the OS, give them thin terminals. If they need the OS, give them the best experience. That is not LTSC. As I see it, it is my job to give them this with as little hassle as possible.

Sitting back with my feet on the desk running LTSC is not what’s best for my users. I prefer LTSC because it does not change substantially over time and precisely because of all of the things that are missing from it Edge, Microsoft Store, Cortana, OneNote, and other modern apps. Howdy, I am developer in a corporate environment. No problems at all. I have not been hindered in anyway by LTSC. Therefore, I cannot confirm any limitations so stated in the parent article. I am very grateful that my orgnization is legally allowed to license LTSC Rich it is vastly superior to other versions and all of the more recent versions have been plagued with varying degrees of problems.

LTSC is what normal Windows 10 should be. It is extremely unfortunate that it is not readily available to all consumers as an alternative to the bloated and unstable versions they are expected to tolerate. So I installed it into my Mac Pro Bootcamp partition in early summer this year. I am kind of dismayed by the lack of updates for what to me, appears to be a superior version of Windows One without the “Windows Store”, if I want to run it that way.

Actually, I found a script that added the store back in, so I can use most of my paid store apps. But no “Cortana”, I think the update for Cortana in was excellent, much more friendly. In my situation, I use Windows to drive workstations for Audio and Video editing, so I don’t want a lot of excess junk gobbling up resources.

Because I need every byte of memory available and I need to keep my system drive lean, as sometimes I am limited to GB partitions. I still have LTSC installed, but it has not updated to much newer than At some point, I may want to officially get this build, it is so much better for me. My question is, how exactly do I do that? And, are there any major updates coming down the pipe, I had read that one was coming in Fall I can’t remember the source for that though.

The whole purpose of LTSC is so it doesn’t update to new feature packs and removes store and other stuff you wouldn’t want in the image. If you don’t want updates in your build, turn them off. You must be a registered user to add a comment. If you’ve already registered, sign in. Otherwise, register and sign in. Products 70 Special Topics 19 Video Hub Most Active Hubs Microsoft Teams.

Security, Compliance and Identity. Microsoft Edge Insider. Azure Databases. Project Bonsai. Education Sector. Microsoft Localization. Microsoft PnP. Healthcare and Life Sciences. Internet of Things IoT. Enabling Remote Work.

Small and Medium Business. Humans of IT. Green Tech. MVP Award Program. Video Hub Azure. Microsoft Business. Microsoft Enterprise. Browse All Community Hubs.

Turn on suggestions. Auto-suggest helps you quickly narrow down your search results by suggesting possible matches as you type. Showing results for. Show only Search instead for. Did you mean:. Sign In. Find out more. LTSC: What is it, and when should it be used? John Wilcox. Published PM K Views. Making a fully informed choice about the LTSC Before its release and throughout the first year of Windows 10, many predicted that LTSC would be the preferred servicing channel for enterprise customers.

Considerations All too often, I have seen strategic decisions about Windows 10 servicing options and the use of the Long-Term Servicing Channel driven by the wrong criteria; for example, IT professional familiarity prevailing over end user value and impact.

When choosing to utilize the LTSC, you must factor hardware into your decision, making sure you have a long-term supply of devices and service components for the life of your expected usage of the device. If the hardware your device is using needs to be replaced in five years, do you have a replacement supply to support the version you are running? New peripheral support : Because the API and driver support models are not changing, the LTSC release you deploy may not support new hardware or peripherals that you need to use in your organization.

Many ISVs do not support LTSC editions for their applications, as they want their applications to use the latest innovation and capabilities to give users the best experience. Best security : Windows 10, with the latest feature update installed, is always the most secure release of Windows 10, offering the latest security capabilities and functionality. I manage specialty devices for an enterprise. I understand the desire to limit enterprises from deploying LTSC to the office environment but Microsoft does a poor job of understanding the specialty uses for windows.

Tammy You’ve hit the nail on the head of why I’m being critical of this decision. Right now we have Enterprise LTSC running digital signage, self-service kiosks, machines that control mass spectrometers and NMR in labs, and various medical devices in our health center.

But until we have more info on such plans or lack thereof, “just use IoT” is easier said than done. Which makes the answers here all the more patronizing, frankly In the mean time, the net result for us as an organization is that future Enterprise LTSC releases just got their support halved for no valid reason.

Also, it is too costly to expect us to have to replace process control equipment every 5 years. We hope Microsoft comes to their senses and reverses this decision in time for the next LTSC version. You can install Windows 10 Enterprise semi-annual channel on the devices in your infrastructure that the IW uses, and LTSC on the specialized devices all with the same license. AngryJohnny75 Thanks for that feedback.

Along with the other feedback we’ve received here I’ll be brining this back to our product group. In your scenario, yes, staying on LTSC is probably the best solution for you. Joe Lurie , thanks for your prompt response. To be perfectly clear, since LTSC has only 5 years of support – we see no valid reason for adopting this new version whatsoever.

For new information worker desktops, we will continue to deploy Windows 10 SAC as originally instructed by Microsoft. But as others have already mentioned – we find the current distribution and licensing of IoT to be extremely constraining therefore making deployment of IoT limited and impractical in most cases. AngryJohnny75 we will have issues with the fact that LTSC only supports up to 10th generation intel, right?

If we have to get them from an IOT vendor it will force many orgs to do purchasing rounds with increased costs as result. Worse is the loss of flexibility. A License bought through Dell for example can’t be moved to an HP. That will also increase license and operational costs. The use case here is a desktop used as kiosk machine and the need for the kiosk goes away – the desktop gets reimaged with standard enterprise making it org standard and freeing that ltsc license.

The next day a new kiosk need arises in an office miles away. Today you would take a spare usable desktop at that office and reimage it with the ltsc image and done. With IoT you now must have machines of both types standard and IoT in store and you as result again will have increased costs for logistics.

Also: With a 10 year support cycle and a three year release cycle you can get 9 years out of your LTSC build with a year for dev and deployment. With a 5 year support and 3 year release, you will have to reimage for every release once again increasing operational costs a lot.

Is this is a way to go? It still means costs and downtime on that box regardless of how you do it. If you have to do it three times it costs 3X as much as doing it once Since 10 year support only will apply to IoT not to standard OEM you must get the IoT version and none of my vendors can supply it without selling it as a part of a HW – Can you buy it as a license only?

The concern here is how do we maintain 10 year support by obtaining LTSC IoT licenses that can be transferred between hardware manufacturers. Windows 7 got updates to support new hardware over teh years. Windows 10 LTSC f. Sooner or later the available hardware on the market changes.

So what shell I do with an operating system what have support for 10 years but after four, five or even seven years there is no hardware I can install it on? Maybe some people have special hardware what will be sold an supported over such a long time but I’m in doubt that this is the case for the most of us. But we believe that we must change to a newer version of Windows 10 LTSC before the support for ends because of the hardware problem.

Barbara Joost the situation is even worse based on your scenario. LTSC does only support the hardware available at release. But sooner or later Dell must follow the change in the CPU architecture in the technical world around. At this point we must change to a newer version of LTSC too in the case we buy new machines. I’m sure this will not take 10 years. This will happen earlier.

So it makes not so much sens in my eyes to support an LTSC over 10 years. Do we have a better date on availability than just second half of ? I run a department at a college and we can’t have a semi annual upgrades wreck software, so LTSC is what I’ve been using with our E5 license. I’m at the point where the software wants the newer features, but postponing a Windows feature upgrade for X months is still not a workable solution.

LTSC is the best way forward for me since my licensing allows me to use it. It is time that I start working on new images in preparation for the Summer work to get everything ready for the Fall semester. In my experience most people I met are upset about the SAC because they still do manual images, sysprep and all the stuff as they did ever since.

Tammy Thanks, I guess that didn’t click. Might be an issue and I guess I’ll find out in the next few months when I log in and check for a download. It would be sad to see this option go because there are a lot of places that aren’t connected to internet, etc. We work on a hardware cycle every 5-ish years, so the new term isn’t a big deal to me. But sometime I need to get with the current times and set up something like MDM.

I would say SCCM, our college has this running, but the costs the last time I checked were far more than my little department can afford. I’m technically a separate everything from the college, the only thing I share is the internet connection behind my own firewall. About 60 workstations at this time, so pretty small in the grand scheme of things.

Joe Lurie do you know anyone who’s working on the update history pages? I have asked Aria Carley many weeks ago and she passed it on, but it wasn’t fixed. In fact it’s super easy to upgrade those versions since you do not have to worry about all the other superfluous, non-OS essential things that are in the normal Win10 versions. Also, lol to anyone who has to support embedded machines and now have to deal with an out-of-support OS within 5 years, hell there were still embedded things running WinXp not more than a few years ago.

Microsoft should stick to the model of LTSC being 10 years, it works well in edu where we don’t want the store and to be honest we won’t run them for 10 years, but it’s reassuring to know that an old machine tucked away is still going to get security updates and when there are over machines to update, that have to fit around a curriculum with a finite team of staff and about million other objectives to sort, this 5 year thing is just disappointing, 7 perhaps. I hear you on all points.

But be careful wishing for Mac OS, they are now pushing updates without any input from the admins. LTSC has been a huge labor saver for me, and I truly hope they will reconsider only distributing through 5 vendors and let us go back to downloading it from our accounts like the other operating systems. Education is another perfect example of why this distribution should exist, we need stability, and releasing feature updates in the middle of the semesters is not very nice.

And not all of us can afford cost or time to run SCCM or whatever they are calling it now. I may need to go back and use a WSUS server so I might have a little control, but that means more time to go in and approve updates, etc. That said, I’m going to have to go through and build images of Enterprise for my computers and hope that a change happens and I can roll out the newer LTSC instead.

In fact, many people still use Windows 7 with the only problem besides of possible security issues that web browsers won’t update anymore over this platform. But I love the steadiness and quietness of windows LTSC, only security fixes but not huge updates that bothers people’s life. I personally don’t like to have games like Candy crush, Xbox services! You must be a registered user to add a comment. If you’ve already registered, sign in. Otherwise, register and sign in.

Products 70 Special Topics 19 Video Hub Most Active Hubs Microsoft Teams. Security, Compliance and Identity. Microsoft Edge Insider. Azure Databases. Project Bonsai. Education Sector. Microsoft Localization. Microsoft PnP. Healthcare and Life Sciences. Internet of Things IoT.

Enabling Remote Work. Small and Medium Business. Humans of IT. Green Tech. MVP Award Program. Video Hub Azure.

 
 

Windows 10 enterprise ltsc 2019 vs 2016 free download.Windows 10 Ltsc Download Iso

 
For example, managed devices can have cameras disabled when at a work location, the cellular service can be disabled when outside the country to avoid roaming charges, or the wireless network can be disabled when the device isn’t within the corporate building or campus.

 

Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC – What’s new in Windows | Microsoft Docs

 

If multiple USB drives are inserted in your PC, select the one that you want to make bootable from the drop down menu. In June , Microsoft announced it would split Windows Server into two channels Click “Windows To Go” option to proceed. In this window, it will automatically search for all inserted USB drives.

More items The most common use of an image file is to write it to a blank CD-R or DVD-R, resulting in an identical copy of the original disc including file name and volume label information.

Filter by: All. Windows 10 Ltsc Download Iso – travelusandcanada. Download Windows 10 IoT Core – microsoft. Windows 10 LTSC. The Fastest Operating System? LTSC: What is it, and when should it be used? How to get an ISO image?

What is ISO in Microsoft? Which makes the answers here all the more patronizing, frankly In the mean time, the net result for us as an organization is that future Enterprise LTSC releases just got their support halved for no valid reason. Also, it is too costly to expect us to have to replace process control equipment every 5 years. We hope Microsoft comes to their senses and reverses this decision in time for the next LTSC version.

You can install Windows 10 Enterprise semi-annual channel on the devices in your infrastructure that the IW uses, and LTSC on the specialized devices all with the same license.

AngryJohnny75 Thanks for that feedback. Along with the other feedback we’ve received here I’ll be brining this back to our product group. In your scenario, yes, staying on LTSC is probably the best solution for you.

Joe Lurie , thanks for your prompt response. To be perfectly clear, since LTSC has only 5 years of support – we see no valid reason for adopting this new version whatsoever. For new information worker desktops, we will continue to deploy Windows 10 SAC as originally instructed by Microsoft.

But as others have already mentioned – we find the current distribution and licensing of IoT to be extremely constraining therefore making deployment of IoT limited and impractical in most cases. AngryJohnny75 we will have issues with the fact that LTSC only supports up to 10th generation intel, right?

If we have to get them from an IOT vendor it will force many orgs to do purchasing rounds with increased costs as result. Worse is the loss of flexibility. A License bought through Dell for example can’t be moved to an HP. That will also increase license and operational costs. The use case here is a desktop used as kiosk machine and the need for the kiosk goes away – the desktop gets reimaged with standard enterprise making it org standard and freeing that ltsc license.

The next day a new kiosk need arises in an office miles away. Today you would take a spare usable desktop at that office and reimage it with the ltsc image and done. With IoT you now must have machines of both types standard and IoT in store and you as result again will have increased costs for logistics.

Also: With a 10 year support cycle and a three year release cycle you can get 9 years out of your LTSC build with a year for dev and deployment. With a 5 year support and 3 year release, you will have to reimage for every release once again increasing operational costs a lot. Is this is a way to go? It still means costs and downtime on that box regardless of how you do it.

If you have to do it three times it costs 3X as much as doing it once Since 10 year support only will apply to IoT not to standard OEM you must get the IoT version and none of my vendors can supply it without selling it as a part of a HW – Can you buy it as a license only? The concern here is how do we maintain 10 year support by obtaining LTSC IoT licenses that can be transferred between hardware manufacturers. Windows 7 got updates to support new hardware over teh years.

Windows 10 LTSC f. Sooner or later the available hardware on the market changes. So what shell I do with an operating system what have support for 10 years but after four, five or even seven years there is no hardware I can install it on? Maybe some people have special hardware what will be sold an supported over such a long time but I’m in doubt that this is the case for the most of us. But we believe that we must change to a newer version of Windows 10 LTSC before the support for ends because of the hardware problem.

Barbara Joost the situation is even worse based on your scenario. LTSC does only support the hardware available at release. But sooner or later Dell must follow the change in the CPU architecture in the technical world around. At this point we must change to a newer version of LTSC too in the case we buy new machines.

I’m sure this will not take 10 years. This will happen earlier. So it makes not so much sens in my eyes to support an LTSC over 10 years. Do we have a better date on availability than just second half of ?

I run a department at a college and we can’t have a semi annual upgrades wreck software, so LTSC is what I’ve been using with our E5 license. I’m at the point where the software wants the newer features, but postponing a Windows feature upgrade for X months is still not a workable solution. LTSC is the best way forward for me since my licensing allows me to use it. It is time that I start working on new images in preparation for the Summer work to get everything ready for the Fall semester.

In my experience most people I met are upset about the SAC because they still do manual images, sysprep and all the stuff as they did ever since. Tammy Thanks, I guess that didn’t click. Might be an issue and I guess I’ll find out in the next few months when I log in and check for a download.

It would be sad to see this option go because there are a lot of places that aren’t connected to internet, etc. We work on a hardware cycle every 5-ish years, so the new term isn’t a big deal to me. But sometime I need to get with the current times and set up something like MDM. I would say SCCM, our college has this running, but the costs the last time I checked were far more than my little department can afford.

I’m technically a separate everything from the college, the only thing I share is the internet connection behind my own firewall. About 60 workstations at this time, so pretty small in the grand scheme of things.

Joe Lurie do you know anyone who’s working on the update history pages? I have asked Aria Carley many weeks ago and she passed it on, but it wasn’t fixed. In fact it’s super easy to upgrade those versions since you do not have to worry about all the other superfluous, non-OS essential things that are in the normal Win10 versions.

Also, lol to anyone who has to support embedded machines and now have to deal with an out-of-support OS within 5 years, hell there were still embedded things running WinXp not more than a few years ago. Microsoft should stick to the model of LTSC being 10 years, it works well in edu where we don’t want the store and to be honest we won’t run them for 10 years, but it’s reassuring to know that an old machine tucked away is still going to get security updates and when there are over machines to update, that have to fit around a curriculum with a finite team of staff and about million other objectives to sort, this 5 year thing is just disappointing, 7 perhaps.

I hear you on all points. But be careful wishing for Mac OS, they are now pushing updates without any input from the admins. LTSC has been a huge labor saver for me, and I truly hope they will reconsider only distributing through 5 vendors and let us go back to downloading it from our accounts like the other operating systems.

Education is another perfect example of why this distribution should exist, we need stability, and releasing feature updates in the middle of the semesters is not very nice. But these protections can also be configured separately. To help underscore the distinct value of these protections, code integrity policies have been rebranded as Windows Defender Application Control. Endpoint detection and response is improved.

Enterprise customers can now take advantage of the entire Windows security stack with Microsoft Defender Antivirus detections and Device Guard blocks being surfaced in the Microsoft Defender for Endpoint portal. Windows Defender is now called Microsoft Defender Antivirus and now shares detection status between M services and interoperates with Microsoft Defender for Endpoint. Additional policies have also been implemented to enhance cloud based protection, and new channels are available for emergency protection.

For more information, see Virus and threat protection and Use next-gen technologies in Microsoft Defender Antivirus through cloud-delivered protection. We’ve also increased the breadth of the documentation library for enterprise security admins.

The new library includes information on:. Deploying and enabling AV protection. Managing updates. Configuring features. Some of the highlights of the new library include Evaluation guide for Microsoft Defender AV and Deployment guide for Microsoft Defender AV in a virtual desktop infrastructure environment. Updates to how the Block at First Sight feature can be configured. The ability to specify the level of cloud-protection. We’ve invested heavily in helping to protect against ransomware , and we continue that investment with updated behavior monitoring and always-on real-time protection.

Endpoint detection and response is also enhanced. New detection capabilities include:. Use the threat intelligence API to create custom alerts – Understand threat intelligence concepts, enable the threat intel application, and create custom threat intelligence alerts for your organization. Threat response is improved when an attack is detected, enabling immediate action by security teams to contain a breach:. Additional capabilities have been added to help you gain a holistic view on investigations include:.

Threat analytics – Threat Analytics is a set of interactive reports published by the Microsoft Defender for Endpoint research team as soon as emerging threats and outbreaks are identified. The reports help security operations teams assess impact on their environment and provides recommended actions to contain, increase organizational resilience, and prevent specific threats.

Query data using Advanced hunting in Microsoft Defender for Endpoint. Use Automated investigations to investigate and remediate threats. Investigate a user account – Identify user accounts with the most active alerts and investigate cases of potential compromised credentials. Alert process tree – Aggregates multiple detections and related events into a single view to reduce case resolution time.

Check sensor health state – Check an endpoint’s ability to provide sensor data and communicate with the Microsoft Defender for Endpoint service and fix known issues. Integration with Azure Defender – Microsoft Defender for Endpoint integrates with Azure Defender to provide a comprehensive server protection solution. With this integration Azure Defender can leverage the power of Defender for Endpoint to provide improved threat detection for Windows Servers.

Integration with Microsoft Cloud App Security – Microsoft Cloud App Security leverages Microsoft Defender for Endpoint signals to allow direct visibility into cloud application usage including the use of unsupported cloud services shadow IT from all Defender for Endpoint monitored machines.

You’ll be able to onboard Windows Server in the same method available for Windows 10 client machines. Onboard previous versions of Windows – Onboard supported versions of Windows machines so that they can send sensor data to the Microsoft Defender for Endpoint sensor. Enable conditional access to better protect users, devices, and data. Click Manage providers to see a list of all the other security providers including antivirus, firewall, and web protection that are running on your device.

Also see New capabilities of Microsoft Defender for Endpoint further maximizing the effectiveness and robustness of endpoint security. For more information about features of Microsoft Defender for Endpoint available in different editions of Windows 10, see the Windows 10 commercial edition comparison. Microsoft Intune helps you create and deploy your Windows Information Protection WIP policy, including letting you choose your allowed apps, your WIP-protection level, and how to find enterprise data on the network.

You can also now collect your audit event logs by using the Reporting configuration service provider CSP or the Windows Event Forwarding for Windows desktop domain-joined devices. This release enables support for WIP with Files on Demand, allows file encryption while the file is open in another app, and improves performance. The minimum PIN length is being changed from 6 to 4, with a default of 6. For more information, see BitLocker Group Policy settings.

You can choose which encryption algorithm to apply to BitLocker encryption capable devices, rather than automatically having those devices encrypt themselves with the default algorithm. This allows the encryption algorithm and other BitLocker policies that must be applied prior to encryption , to be delivered before BitLocker encryption begins.

Configure the encryption method settings in the Windows 10 Endpoint Protection profile to the desired encryption algorithm. Assign the policy to your Autopilot device group. New features in Windows Hello enable a better device lock experience, using multifactor unlock with new location and user proximity signals.

Using Bluetooth signals, you can configure your Windows 10 device to automatically lock when you walk away from it, or to prevent others from accessing the device when you are not present. New features in Windows Hello for Business include:. You can now reset a forgotten PIN without deleting company managed data or apps on devices managed by Microsoft Intune.

Windows Hello is now password-less on S-mode. Account Protection will encourage password users to set up Windows Hello Face, Fingerprint or PIN for faster sign in, and will notify Dynamic lock users if Dynamic lock has stopped working because their phone or device Bluetooth is off. Previously, you had to navigate deep into Settings to find Windows Hello. It is easier to set up Dynamic lock, and WD SC actionable alerts have been added when Dynamic lock stops working ex: phone Bluetooth is off.

Windows Defender Credential Guard is a security service in Windows 10 built to protect Active Directory AD domain credentials so that they can’t be stolen or misused by malware on a user’s machine. It is designed to protect against well-known threats such as Pass-the-Hash and credential harvesting.

Windows Defender Credential Guard has always been an optional feature, but Windows 10 in S mode turns this functionality on by default when the machine has been Azure Active Directory joined.

This provides an added level of security when connecting to domain resources not normally present on devices running Windows 10 in S mode. For more information, see Credential Guard Security Considerations. Microsoft has released new Windows security baselines for Windows Server and Windows A security baseline is a group of Microsoft-recommended configuration settings with an explanation of their security impact.

Windows security baselines have been updated for Windows A security baseline is a group of Microsoft-recommended configuration settings and explains their security impact.

The new security baseline for Windows 10 version has been published. You can still get to the app in all the usual ways — simply ask Cortana to open Windows Security Center WSC or interact with the taskbar icon.

The WSC service now requires antivirus products to run as a protected process to register.

 
 

Windows 10 enterprise ltsc 2019 vs 2016 free download

 
 
Users attempt to connect to a Miracast receiver as they did previously. If not, you likely need to purchase LTSC. You can now run your own custom actions or scripts in parallel with Windows Setup. For more information, see Enroll a Windows 10 device automatically using Group Policy.

Related posts